Some may wonder why tiny houses are so darned narrow. Well, like a lot of things in life, it’s actually for a very practical reason: because tiny houses are built on wheeled trailer bases, they often have to be built no more than 8.5 feet wide, in order for them to be towed on the road without a special permit.

But as anyone who’s lived in a small space will tell you, even an extra few inches can make a huge difference in how it can be laid out, how much storage space you will have, and how the interior will feel overall. So it’s no wonder that some tiny homeowners will opt for a slightly wider tiny house despite the extra hassle of a permit when it comes to moving day.

A great example of how it can be done is this spacious gem of an extra-wide tiny house, built by Mitchcraft Tiny Homes. The Fort Collins, Colorado-based tiny house builder has constructed fully featured, extra-wide tiny houses before, and similarly, this 10-foot-wide tiny house uses those surplus inches quite well.

Created for a client named Kay, this unique 380-square-foot tiny house incorporates a generously sized living room and kitchen, plenty of storage everywhere, plus a full-sized bathtub.

Measuring about 29 feet long, the exterior of Kay’s tiny house is covered with a beautiful combination of white-painted wood and metal siding, all offset by the natural textures of wooden shingles.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


Coming into the tiny home through the two entry doors, we arrive in the main living space, which is laid out in an open plan and includes the living room and kitchen. Looking up, we see that a skylight has been strategically placed here to augment and accentuate the openness and height of the space, in addition to bringing more natural light.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


The living room proper has two built-in couches that are arranged in an L-shape, with storage integrated underneath. There is a built-in bookcase to one side, and a ladder made out of pipes that leads up to the secondary loft above. The key to making this compact space work is the addition of windows on all sides, which gives the impression that one isn’t boxed in.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


The secondary loft here has enough space and two operable windows that allows it to be used as a leisure space, or an extra bedroom for a guest or child.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


Back downstairs, the kitchen offers a soothing palette of green and light-colored wooden elements, some elegant touches of gold from the fixtures, as well as the bold, graphic patterns of the tiled backsplash behind the stovetop. Open shelving here allows the client to store and display their kitchen wares.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


We love how the extra-wide dimension of this house permits for the design of a counter that begins with a rounded form, before snaking around to envelop this small farmhouse sink.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


Details like this integrated slide-out cutting board that has a hole to accommodate easy composting make all the difference here.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


No space has been wasted here: beside the full-sized refrigerator, we have a broom closet for storing cleaning equipment.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


The wider dimension of this tiny home means that the placement of the stairs could be a little more flexible. Here, rather than running straight up along one wall, the extra space means that this staircase can make a turn. It also incorporates some handy storage drawers too.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


Here is a view of that bathroom with its regular-sized bathtub, sink vanity, and toilet tucked in the far corner.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


As we come onto the landing, we see that it’s actually a bit lower than the master bedroom, meaning that the client can stand up when accessing the large closet and washer and dryer. This space is cleverly done, considering that walk-in closets aren’t all that common in tiny homes.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


There’s even more storage behind the sliding barn doors…

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


… and more storage and seating baked into these steps.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


Going up the steps, we find the master bedroom, which is lit and ventilated by two windows to either side.

phoco Photography, Alec Savig


All told, the project cost approximately $171,000 to build, which is definitely on the more expensive end of the tiny home spectrum. Nevertheless, this is a gorgeous specimen of an extra-wide tiny home that has been tailored to fit its owner, and you can see more over at Mitchcraft Tiny Homes.